Sunday, August 23, 2015

A Girly Grey Cardigan

A request for something with silver in for all the girly things little girls wear had me looking hard for something to edge a basic grey cardigan Sarah had asked me to knit for her Evelyn.

We needed it to be something easy to wash so I chose an acrylic from Spotlight - 4 Seasons Marvel 8 Ply Yarn Light 100 g in grey. But the silver trim was a bit harder to find . In the end I just used DMC Perle Metallic Thread in silver as I just was using it around the edges and crocheting it rather than knitting with it. I used to lengths of it to make it thick enough to match the thickness of the wool I had used.





I had numerous patterns from my collection so was able to find a basic drop should cardigan pattern in double knit and the size I needed.








Some time ago Jennifer had given me a huge collection of buttons she had been passed on from an elderly lady and I had fun finding a set of silver buttons to match.







I wasn't completely happy with the way the silver thread 'sat' once crocheted but I'm hoping it will be better after a few washes and being acrylic it can be done in the machine rather than hand washing.

And Evelyn seemed pretty pleased with the end result which is good as she had mentioned to me, one time I had visited, that she couldn't wait for her knitting to be done! Something a Nana quiet likes to hear.

It maybe a little big but that allows for growth and also the chance of it lasting more than one years worth of seasons

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

The Little Things On The Day

So while the men were doing what men love to do with diggers and the such when I was invited to "Come For A Ride To Paeroa" I had my new tool and filled some of my spare time with a few shots.

Just the little things you notice but some times actually just ignore....








 




Monday, August 17, 2015

Come For A Ride To Paeroa

Harry asked me after August’s South Waikato's Four Wheel Drive Club meeting if I would like to come for a drive with him to Paeroa. He had volunteered to take up some cut down concrete power line poles to Paeroa. So I thought why not - the weather wasn’t supposed to be very good for doing much outside in the garden so a ride with Harry for the morning would be nice.

I woke early with the alarms going off (we were supposed to meet in Matamata at 9.00am) and had a cuppa. After the alarm-going-off countless times and Harry pushing the snooze button, I decided that enough was enough and at 7.30am he needed to be up for some breakfast so we could get there in time. “We still needed to fill up on fuel” he said, so he had less than hour.

Needless to say we were late…

Once in Matamata Kevin loaded the sawn off poles into the three trailers with a forklift. Steve and Harry helped ‘direct’ the poles so that they would sit well in the trailers.



We travelled up to Paeroa, through the Karangahake Gorge and up past the Waitawheta turnoff.








Memories of primary school camps for the cherubs came to mind as we drove past the Waitawheta
Camp.


Well it seemed that we were going a lot further than just up from Paeroa but as I said it was nice to go for a drive and I had my latest knitting project with me so I was happy. It was getting chilly but we had the Isuzu’s heater blasting to keep us warm and to cool the engine down as it was struggling a little with the load in the trailer as we wound up and around, the now dirt track, to our destination.


When we arrived there was the digger or “dig” as Harry referred to it. It was unloaded from its trailer and proceeded to unload each trailer of poles stacking them for when they would be used.










The South Waikato Four Wheel Drive Club (SW4WDC) had volunteered to help with an issue arisen with work on the Waitawheta 4WD track.




There has been a lot of misuse of the track and it was getting worse. The Department of Conservation (DOC) closes the track from 1st May to the Friday before Labour weekend but someone (or a group) have been breaking the locked gate and using the track.





DOC have been trying for some time, to keep the track locked but the culprit keeps breaking in and the track is getting worse with huge ruts filling with water after rain and just getting bigger and making the track quite impassable.

With DOC saying, if it doesn’t stop they will close the track completely, the club decided to help as they like to use it when it is open for its allocated season.

The SW4WDC are putting the concrete poles into the track path to stop vehicles going past and will help fill the huge ruts in the track so that by the spring/summer season the track will be usable for all.



This is all well and good but I didn’t know that this little exercise was going to take, what I would call, (I hear echo’s from Miranda) all day!

I would have at least brought the thermos of hot water and makings for a cuppa and a bite to eat. All we had were some lollies in a bag and the glove-box and by 12.30 we were in to them.







As it now seemed we were here for the day I joined the guys and the “dig” as it dug and graded dirt to fill some of the first rut and then finally insert the posts, ducking for cover as a couple of squally showers passed over us.

We finally made our way off the hill at 4.00pm calling in at the Joker Café for some well over due lunch.


So…

The following is a little entry of what the big boys do when the big toys come out

or

an exercise in good citizenship towards the environment.





video

Bringing up the poles
View down to the car park


Working out the spot for the barriers 


First post hole


video
video
Second hole; Note: a frozen Harry

Digging
video

Trying to pick up the second pole


video
At last the poles are in 


As seen from the car park.


Friday, July 31, 2015

The Winter Garden

Our garden is still doing well despite the cold wet winter days.

The section of this year’s plot that has not been planted yet is continually being increased with stable scrapings (note the bags we collect free from the stable gates in Matamata, in the next plot to the left), ash from our wood burner and the ‘empties’ when I clean out the chooks nesting area. It is then dug over with a fork and raked. This keeps feeding the garden with nutrients and helps keep any weeds that might pop up, at bay.


We have been eating silver beet leaves when stirred into soups, casseroles and stir-fries, if not quickly steamed and served with a little butter. The plant was one transplanted from the old garden, so it was good to see it survive.

















There has also been the occasional meal off the transplanted broccoli plants left over from the old garden and safely regrowing after the shift.

And I am pleased to say that we have had our first meal off a couple of the new broccoli plants and despite them being home grown, there were no caterpillars (Katrina) and when served at our annual mid-winter feast there was none left over. I try not to use any pesticides in the veggie garden as I am still not convinced they are safe even if the correct period of ‘waiting’ is adhered to and they are washed thoroughly. This means in the heat of summer, there is often a long process of picking out the caterpillars when they are being prepared to eat and sometimes they will still fall out upon cooking. If I have still been amiss they may still end up on one’s plate, an event Katrina will never miss telling me so.

It was lovely to go and harvest some greens from the garden for our meal with the family and even more of a joy to have young Natalie help with the carrying of the basket.

One of the bonuses of having the garden run amuck and the parsnips going to seed last summer is that there are lots of self-sewn parsnips coming up and those that I have let grow are now just coming on ready to eat. We are even having a little side serving of salad leaves from the lettuce plants, when I peel off some of the outside leaves allowing the plants to continue to grow and mature.